Ear Problems – Mastoiditis

Mastoiditis pic

Mastoiditis
Image: webmd.com

An otolaryngologist, Dr. Frank Brettschneider treats patients with conditions of the ear, nose, and throat through his private practice in Port Huron, Michigan. In preparation for his medical career, Dr. Frank Brettschneider completed his otolaryngology and oro-facial plastic surgery residency at Clemens General Hospital. Among the conditions he is experienced at treating is mastoiditis.

The mastoid is a bone that makes up a portion of the skull that runs behind the ear. Sometimes, this bone can became infected, giving rise to a condition called “mastoiditis.” Usually, the infection begins in the ear and then spreads to the mastoid bone. Most cases of mastoiditis appear in children, and before the era of antibiotics, the condition was a major contributor to childhood mortality.

Symptoms of mastoiditis include hearing loss, which often gets worse as the infection progresses. Moreover, the condition causes pain, fever, and redness in the area around the mastoid. It many also result in ear discharge resembling pus.

Once settled in the mastoid, the infection can be hard to address in that drugs have difficulty penetrating the bone. Doctors may suggest oral and injected antibiotics or, in cases where antibiotics fail, surgery to clean out the mastoid.

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Michigan Osteopathic Association Welcomes Members to Conference

 

Michigan Osteopathic Association pic

Michigan Osteopathic Association
Image: domoa.org

A graduate of Michigan State University’s osteopathic medicine doctoral program, Dr. Frank Brettschneider serves as president, physician, and surgeon of Port Huron Ear, Nose, and Throat located in Port Huron, Michigan. To help him stay up-to-date, Dr. Frank Brettschneider belongs to several professional organizations, including the Michigan Osteopathic Association (MOA).

As one of the largest state-based osteopathic organizations, MOA represents more than 8,000 medical students and osteopathic physicians in Michigan. Established more than 115 years ago, the organization advances the science of osteopathic medicine, improves the overall treatment of human ailments, and strengthens osteopathic medicine in the state. In addition, MOA promotes effective patient care, advocates for its members, and offers informational sessions.

One of these informational sessions occurs each summer. The 2017 Summer Conference takes place from June 15 through 18 at Mission Point Resort at Mackinac Island. Those in attendance have an opportunity to garner 20 to 22 continuing medical educational (CME) credits. They can also meet with exhibitors to learn more about changes made within the industry and how products and services can help members adapt.

An Introduction to Sublingual Immunotherapy

Sublingual Immunotherapy pic

Sublingual Immunotherapy
Image: aaaai.org

As president of Port Huron Ear, Nose, and Throat in Michigan, Dr. Frank Brettschneider offers a variety of treatments for allergies. Dr. Frank Brettschneider and his colleagues make use of sublingual immunotherapy, a non-injective treatment methodology.

Sublingual immunotherapy offers preventive care for allergies by increasing tolerance to the allergen over time. It involves first determining the patient’s specific sensitivities. This information then allows the treating physician to prepare or prescribe a targeted allergen extract, which the patient places under the tongue for up to two minutes before swallowing. The patient repeats the process at home, three to seven days per week for approximately three to five years, depending on individual needs.

Sublingual immunotherapy currently stands out as the first preventive treatment not to require injections at an allergist’s office. It enables patients to self-administer, provided they adhere to specific dosage instructions and remain watchful for potential reactions, which may require treatment cessation and/or medical attention. It is currently available off label and for certain inhalant allergies, including dust mites and ragweed.

The Many Uses of BOTOX or Botulinum Toxin

BOTOX

 

Dr. Frank Brettschneider is an accomplished otolaryngologist, surgeon, allergist, and osteopathic doctor with a private practice at Port Huron E.N.T. in Michigan. With a triple board certification in otolaryngology, otolaryngic allergy, and oro-facial plastic, Dr. Frank Brettschneider can provide a range of services to his patients for health or cosmetic reasons. One of the many services available at Port Huron E.N.T. is BOTOX injections.

BOTOX is the trade name for onabotulinumtoxinA, a drug containing botulinum toxin, which is derived from the generally quite poisonous clostridium botulinum bacterium, which is also the cause of the deadly disease botulism.

Botulinum toxin has been used in other contexts for years, and BOTOX was created in 1987, when an ophthalmologist named Jean Carruthers was using it to help patients with spasms in their eye region and noticed that it also made wrinkles disappear. Since then, BOTOX has been approved in 78 countries for cosmetic use, and is a very common treatment today for wrinkles and fine lines. It is generally quite safe in its current use, but there can be side effects and it’s important to get the treatment from a qualified professional.

Increasingly, researchers are studying a range of possible medical uses for botulinum toxin, and it has been shown to help with severe chronic migraines, arthritis, and even for excessive underarm sweating. A small Norwegian study showed that botulinum injections into the lower half of the stomachs of 20 people with obesity helped 75 percent of them lose weight.

Preventative Measures against Loss of Hearing

Loss of Hearing pic

Loss of Hearing
Image: webmd.com

An accomplished ear, nose, and throat specialist, Dr. Frank Brettschneider sees patients at his Port Huron, Michigan, office. Among the individuals Dr. Frank Brettschneider treats are those with hearing loss.

Hearing loss is a common condition that often occurs as people age. However, certain factors can speed up the problem or make it more likely to occur. Therefore, doctors recommend that people follow certain guidelines to prevent hearing loss or slow the progression of the condition.

For instance, you should take care to avoid places and situations with excessively loud noises. You can tell if the noises are too loud if you need to yell to make yourself heard over them. Music at high volumes and noise from construction equipment are a couple of examples. By leaving the area as soon as possible, you can minimize the potential harmful effects of the noise. Similarly, wearing well-fitting earmuffs, earplugs, or even a combination of the two when in a loud place can further help safeguard your hearing.

Other helpful actions include cleaning earwax out of the ears safely. Instead of using a cotton swab, which can make earwax get stuck inside the ear, use an irrigation product specifically designed to remove wax from the ear. Additionally, be sure to get your hearing tested periodically, especially if you start to notice changes in the way you discern sounds. A doctor can identify potential problems at this visit and recommend treatment if necessary.